Language Skills

WHAT IS A LANGUAGE DISORDER?

Language is both Receptive and Expressive. Receptive language is the ability to listen to and understand communication. It requires one to attend to information, discriminate between information presented, organize information in a logical manner, remember information and generalize learned skills in the real world. Expressive language is what we hear students say or what we see them write.

Children with language disorders have difficulty processing language that is spoken and/or written. A receptive language disorder may be related to an existing diagnosis or learning disability or it may stand on its own.  Typically, when a student is struggling to process and produce language, it is best practice to examine his/her academic learning in conjunction with speech. This helps to confirm or rule out co-existing conditions and it makes sure that all of a student’s needs are being met appropriately at school.

WHAT ARE SOME SYMPTOMS OF A LANGUAGE DISORDER?

Symptoms may include:

  • Difficulty following directions – this student may  need frequent repetition of instructions or require directions to be rephrased in order to understand expectations
  • Poor listening skills – this child may have trouble comprehending information
  • Confusion- this child may struggle when confronted with more complex or lengthy information
  • Difficulty with non-literal language – this child may have difficulty making sense of figurative language
  • Needing additional time to process information – this child may have difficulty responding to questions without extra “thinking” time
  • Problems differentiating between different letter sounds – this child may have trouble distinguishing between similar-sounding words
    *information adapted from http://nspt4kids.com/*

DOES A LANGUAGE DISORDER CAUSE THE STUDENT ANY PROBLEMS?

A language disorder may cause difficulty in the areas of : communication, academic activities, and social interactions.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

http://www.asha.org/public/speech/development/

http://www.asha.org/public/speech/development/communicationdevelopment/